Electroplate Table by Elkington & Co.

  • This remarkable parcel-gilt electroplate table hails from renowned British firm Elkington & Co.
  • Elkington & Co. invented the art and science of silver plating
  • Queen Victoria granted them the honor of replicating many royal items, including this table
  • This impressive work measures over three feet high, adding to its rarity and prestige
  • Get complete item description here
Item No. 31-4711

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This remarkable and historic parcel-gilt electroplate table hails from renowned British firm Elkington & Co., the distinguished company that invented the art and science of silver plating. By the 1830s, they were awarded a patent for this revolutionary technique, and within the next decade they had perfected it. This technique and Elkington's artistry were so impressive that Queen Victoria granted them the unique honor of replicating many items in the royal collection, of which this table is one.

While many electroplated items were small housewares or objets d'art, this impressive table measures over three feet high, adding to its rarity and prestige. Repoussé nymphs and fairies dance along the table's surface, while the base is festooned with floral and foliate motifs and subtle gadroons. The combination of gold and silver plate is both elegant and technically marvelous.

Throughout the years, Elkington & Co. were granted royal warrants by Queen Victoria, Queen Alexandra, King George V, King Edward VII, Queen Mary, and King George VI, among many others. They also supplied flatware to the luxury dining sections on the Titanic, as well as other vessels of the famed White Star Line fleet.

Circa 1870

40 3/4" high x 28 1/4" diameter
Electroplate Table by Elkington & Co.
Maker: Elkington & Co.
Period: 19th Century
Origin: England
Type: Other
Depth: 28.25 Inches
Width: 28.25 Inches
Height: 40.75 Inches
Style: Victorian
Electroplate Table by Elkington & Co.
A Guide to Antique Tables

  The extendable English dining table dates to the mid-17th century when tastes moved away from large, static furnishings to lighter, more accommodating styles. Walnut and oak were replaced with mahogany as the wood of choice...

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