Royal Pavilion Skeleton Clock by Smith & Sons

  • This skeleton clock from Smith & Son is an extraordinary example of 19th-century British clockmaking
  • At a time of mass production, Smith & Sons were dedicated to preserving horological excellence
  • The timepiece takes the shape of the famous Royal Pavilion in Brighton, England.
  • Reserved for the most prestigious clientele, it would have been displayed in a regal household
  • Get complete item description here
Price Upon Request Item No. 31-6423

To speak to one of our experts, call 1-888-711-8084

A spectacular feat of engineering and artistry, this 19th-century skeleton clock was created by John Smith & Sons of Clerkenwell. The Clerkenwell Borough of Central London has for almost two centuries been one of the leading centers of clockmaking in England, and J. Smith & Sons was the region's most important skeleton clock craftsman. Smith & Sons' creations are desirable for both their appealing design and mechanical ingenuity, and their elaborate skeleton clocks are particularly prized.

Skeleton clocks are defined by their lack of an external case, revealing the intricacy and beauty of their complex internal workings. This timepiece’s mechanics are on full display, allowing one to marvel at the technical craftsmanship of the two-train movement and the desirable English dead beat escapement. The ornate, Gothic-inspired design of the present clock is composed of a hand-crafted bronze and brass skeleton frame in the shape of the famous Royal Pavilion in Brighton, England. This magnificent work of timepiece artistry is set upon its velvet-covered plinth beneath its original glass dome, making this clock among the finest examples of its kind. At a time when many clockmakers were primarily making affordable clocks using mass production, Smith & Sons were dedicated to preserving the art of horological excellence.

This present clock was featured in Smith & Sons’ catalog in 1865, appearing among the most expensive and prestigious categories of their inventory. By using the average income government worker in 1865 as a gauge, the clock would have cost nearly a full year's wages. Reserved for the most prestigious clientele, this presentation clock would have surely been displayed in a regal household. A skeleton clock very similar to this one was displayed at the illustrious 1851 World’s Fair at the Crystal Palace, and this very clock is illustrated in Royer-Collard's Skeleton Clocks, p. 55.

Circa 1865

24 3/4“ high x 19 1/2” wide x 11“ deep

Literature:
F.B. Royer-Collard, Skeleton Clocks, p. 55.
Royal Pavilion Skeleton Clock by Smith & Sons
Period: 19th Century
Origin: England
Type: Other
Depth: 11.0 Inches
Width: 19.5 Inches
Height: 24.75 Inches
Royal Pavilion Skeleton Clock by Smith & Sons
Unique Clocks Across History

Since the dawn of the first humans, man’s fascination with time has been undeniable. The people of ancient civilizations closely studied celestial bodies to understand the passage of time. From there, inventions and revelations...

read more

Recently Viewed

Back to Top
back to top

Shopping Bag

Your shopping bag is currently empty.