Wedgwood Black Basalt Figure of Cupid

  • This large black basalt figure is an impressive example of Wedgwood’s artistry and imagination
  • To find a black basalt figure this large is quite remarkable
  • A similar example of Cupid in this large size resides at the Wedgwood Museum, Barlaston
  • Get complete item description here
Item No. 31-4245

To speak to one of our experts, call 1-888-711-8084

An important homage to love, this large black basalt figure is an impressive example of Wedgwood's artistry and imagination. Cupid, the ancient Roman god of love, is standing amongst billowing clouds with a pair of doves at his feet. Gazing towards earth with one hand shielding his eyes, the other hand holds an arrow. His bow and quiver rest at his side, ready to take aim. "CUPID" is etched into the base.

Considered a crowning achievement of Wedgwood, black basalt was created by blending manganese with an iron-oxide rich slurry procured from coal mines called carr. In addition to the impressive color, this combination also provided additional strength and solidity. While it initially proved challenging to fire because of its weight, that same characteristic was advantageous in creating ornaments, lending stability to library busts, vases and figures. To find a figure this large is truly remarkable.

This form was first recorded at the Great Exhibition of 1851, London. A similar example of Cupid in this large size resides at the Wedgwood Museum, Barlaston.

Impressed uppercase mark at the back

Circa 1860-1880

12 1/4" wide x 12 1/4" deep x 24" high

Provenance
Herbert & Sylvia Jacobs Collection, no. 551 (label)
Christie’s, New York, 24 April 1994, lot 77
Victor & Muriel Polikoff Collection, no. 431 (label)
Wedgwood Black Basalt Figure of Cupid
Maker: Wedgwood
Period: 19th Century
Origin: England
Type: Figurines/Statuettes
Depth: 12.25
Width: 12.25
Height: 24.0
Style: Basalt

Recently Viewed

Back to Top
back to top

Shopping Bag

Your shopping bag is currently empty.