Artists & Artisans

Green Ronces Vase by René Lalique
Green Ronces Vase by René Lalique
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René Lalique Coquilles Glass Bowls, Set of Ten
René Lalique Coquilles Glass Bowls, Set of Ten
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René Lalique Epis Glass Dish
René Lalique Epis Glass Dish
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René Lalique Lys Footed Bowl
René Lalique Lys Footed Bowl
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Poissons Glass Bowl by René Lalique
Poissons Glass Bowl by René Lalique
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Chardons Vase by René Lalique
Chardons Vase by René Lalique
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René Lalique Poissons Glass Bowl
René Lalique Poissons Glass Bowl
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René Lalique Coquilles Glass Bowl
René Lalique Coquilles Glass Bowl
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Opalescent Glass Bowl by René Lalique
Opalescent Glass Bowl by René Lalique
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René Lalique Sauterelles Frosted Glass Vase
René Lalique Sauterelles Frosted Glass Vase
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Large Coquilles Opalescent Glass Dish by René Lalique
Large Coquilles Opalescent Glass Dish by René Lalique
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René Lalique Opalescent Glass Dish with Large Coquilles Pattern
René Lalique Opalescent Glass Dish with Large Coquilles Pattern
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René Lalique Crémieu Opalescent Glass Bowl
René Lalique Crémieu Opalescent Glass Bowl
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René Lalique Opalescent Glass Medium Coquilles Dish
René Lalique Opalescent Glass Medium Coquilles Dish
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Coquilles Opalescent Glass Dish by René Lalique
Coquilles Opalescent Glass Dish by René Lalique
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René Lalique Medium Coquilles Opalescent Glass Dish
René Lalique Medium Coquilles Opalescent Glass Dish
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René Lalique Domrémy Frosted Glass Vase
René Lalique Domrémy Frosted Glass Vase
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René Lalique Béliers Deep Topaz Glass Vase
René Lalique Béliers Deep Topaz Glass Vase
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René Lalique Glass Dish with Small Coquilles Pattern
René Lalique Glass Dish with Small Coquilles Pattern
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Small Glass Dish with Coquilles Opalescent Glass by René Lalique
Small Glass Dish with Coquilles Opalescent Glass by René Lalique
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René Lalique Malaga Polished Glass Vase
René Lalique Malaga Polished Glass Vase
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René Lalique Cacao Opalescent Glass Bowl
René Lalique Cacao Opalescent Glass Bowl
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René Lalique Danaides Opalescent and Stained Glass Vase
René Lalique Danaides Opalescent and Stained Glass Vase
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René Lalique Gui Opalescent Glass Bowl
René Lalique Gui Opalescent Glass Bowl
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René Lalique Asters Opalescent Glass Bowl
René Lalique Asters Opalescent Glass Bowl
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Camées Glass Vase by René Lalique
Camées Glass Vase by René Lalique
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Laurier Glass Vase by René Lalique
Laurier Glass Vase by René Lalique
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René Lalique Palissy Opalescent Glass Vase
René Lalique Palissy Opalescent Glass Vase
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René Lalique Néfliers Vase
René Lalique Néfliers Vase
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Ceylan Glass Vase by René Lalique
Ceylan Glass Vase by René Lalique
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René Lalique Epis Glass Dish
René Lalique Epis Glass Dish
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René Lalique Amber Ormeaux Vase
René Lalique Amber Ormeaux Vase
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Plumes Glass Vase by René Lalique
Plumes Glass Vase by René Lalique
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René Lalique Rampillon Vase
René Lalique Rampillon Vase
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René Lalique Acanthes Vase
René Lalique Acanthes Vase
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René Lalique Opalescent Formose Vase
René Lalique Opalescent Formose Vase
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René Lalique Borromée Vase
René Lalique Borromée Vase
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René Lalique Ceylan Vase
René Lalique Ceylan Vase
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Green Sauterelles Vase by René Lalique
Green Sauterelles Vase by René Lalique
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René Lalique Charmilles Vase
René Lalique Charmilles Vase
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(1860-1945)

Humble Beginnings

René Jules Lalique, a renowned artist and master glassmaker, was born in 1860 in the picturesque rural region of Aÿ Commune in Northwestern France. When he was just two years old, his family relocated to the bustling suburbs of Paris, an industrialized setting that offered new opportunities. Following the move, Lalique's family continued to visit Aÿ during the summers, reconnecting with the captivating charm of his hometown.

These visits to Aÿ, a town abundant in natural beauty, left an indelible mark on Lalique's artistic vision. The idyllic landscapes and the harmony between man and nature that he witnessed during these trips became a profound source of inspiration for the artist's later glasswork.

Artistic Education

In 1872, at the age of 12, Lalique embarked on his artistic journey by enrolling at the esteemed Collège Turgot. It was during this time that his passion for drawing and sketching began to flourish. Eager to further refine his skills, Lalique dedicated his evenings to attending classes at the prestigious École nationale supérieure des arts décoratifs, where he honed his artistic abilities for two fruitful years. Tragically, Lalique's father passed away in 1875, casting a shadow of sorrow over his young life. It was during this period of loss, however, that Lalique found a new path to pursue. He embarked on an apprenticeship with Louis Aucoc, a distinguished goldsmith and jeweler based in Paris. Working under Aucoc's guidance, Lalique delved into the realm of jewelry production and design.

Lalique's thirst for further artistic growth led him across the English Channel to the Crystal Palace School of Art in London, England. Immersed in this vibrant artistic environment, Lalique's design skills grew, and his naturalistic approach to art became more refined. The experience at Crystal Palace acted as a catalyst, further shaping Lalique's artistic style and propelling him towards greater achievements in his chosen craft.

Rise to Fame

In 1885, armed with his extensive experience, Lalique took a significant leap by establishing his own firm. By this point, Lalique had already garnered a remarkable reputation through his freelance work with esteemed French jewelry firms like Jacta, Cartier, Boucheron and Gariod. The turning point in Lalique's career came at the Paris Exposition Universelle in 1900, a grand event that attracted an astounding 50 million visitors. It was here that Lalique's Art Nouveau brooches and combs captured the attention of the discerning audience and brought him widespread acclaim on an international stage.

Throughout the early years of his firm, Lalique attracted an array of notable patrons, further solidifying his reputation for excellence. One such esteemed client was the legendary French actress Sarah Bernhardt, who adorned herself with Lalique's finest creations, showcasing their exquisite beauty to the world. Additionally, Calouste Gulbenkian, an influential oil magnate, became another distinguished patron of his work.

Inventor of Modern Jewelry: Original Technique

Lalique’s innovative spirit led him to explore and successfully introduce new materials such as horn, ivory, semi-precious stones and glass, which were not widely used before his time. He used these materials to incorporate elements of nature into his creations, much like the Japanese artisans who provided him with much inspiration.

Lalique's visionary approach to artistry distinguished him as a trailblazer, as he prioritized the artistic and aesthetic value of his creations over their price or luxury status. His profound fascination with rock crystal and architectural glass served as the catalyst for his daring experiments, leading to his renowned production of perfume bottles and the establishment of his own glass factories in Combs-la-Ville and Wingen-Sur-Moder, France.

Throughout his illustrious career, Lalique crafted an astonishing array of over 1,500 glass creations, spanning an impressive range of items including ashtrays, seals, clocks, paperweights, car mascots, vases, decanters, pitchers, glasses, stemware, plates, bowls, knife rests, lamps, pendants, brooches, necklaces, statues, plaques and countless other objects. To meet the growing demand from an eager public, specifically with the rise of Art Deco's design popularity, Lalique employed several hundred workers who diligently contributed to the production of these highly sought-after pieces.

Later Life and Legacy

In 1935, Lalique’s artistic prowess extended beyond jewelry as he adorned the haute couture salons of the renowned fashion designer Madeline Vionnet with his exquisite creations. Lalique's creativity also found expression in the form of designing glass doors for the Tokyo residence of Prince Yasuhiko Asaka. In that same remarkable year, he crafted a captivating fountain that graced the Galerie des Champs-Élysées in Paris, a monumental work of public art that captivated all who beheld its beauty. A testament to his prominence and success, the artist also established his own shop on 11 Rue Royal in Paris.

In 1945, Lalique passed away, leaving behind a monumental legacy. His visionary work continues to inspire and captivate audiences to this day, while his company continues to thrive, stewarding his artistic vision. Today, his original artworks are coveted by museums and collectors alike, and his name is practically synonymous with the famed Art Nouveau and Art Deco movements.

Quick Facts:

  • He was born in Aÿ-Champagne, France in 1860.
  • He is best known for his Art Nouveau and Art Deco glasswork, jewelry and perfume bottles.
  • His work was influenced by Japanese art, natural forms and symbolism.
  • He was a pioneer of new techniques in glassmaking, such as the use of mold-blown glass.
  • He was the first glassmaker to be elected to the Académie des Beaux-Arts in 1925.
  • Spouses:
    • Marie-Louise Lambert
    • Alice Ledru
  • He died in Paris in 1945.

Artists

(1860-1945)

Humble Beginnings

René Jules Lalique, a renowned artist and master glassmaker, was born in 1860 in the picturesque rural region of Aÿ Commune in Northwestern France. When he was just two years old, his family relocated to the bustling suburbs of Paris, an industrialized setting that offered new opportunities. Following the move, Lalique's family continued to visit Aÿ during the summers, reconnecting with the captivating charm of his hometown.

These visits to Aÿ, a town abundant in natural beauty, left an indelible mark on Lalique's artistic vision. The idyllic landscapes and the harmony between man and nature that he witnessed during these trips became a profound source of inspiration for the artist's later glasswork.

Artistic Education

In 1872, at the age of 12, Lalique embarked on his artistic journey by enrolling at the esteemed Collège Turgot. It was during this time that his passion for drawing and sketching began to flourish. Eager to further refine his skills, Lalique dedicated his evenings to attending classes at the prestigious École nationale supérieure des arts décoratifs, where he honed his artistic abilities for two fruitful years. Tragically, Lalique's father passed away in 1875, casting a shadow of sorrow over his young life. It was during this period of loss, however, that Lalique found a new path to pursue. He embarked on an apprenticeship with Louis Aucoc, a distinguished goldsmith and jeweler based in Paris. Working under Aucoc's guidance, Lalique delved into the realm of jewelry production and design.

Lalique's thirst for further artistic growth led him across the English Channel to the Crystal Palace School of Art in London, England. Immersed in this vibrant artistic environment, Lalique's design skills grew, and his naturalistic approach to art became more refined. The experience at Crystal Palace acted as a catalyst, further shaping Lalique's artistic style and propelling him towards greater achievements in his chosen craft.

Rise to Fame

In 1885, armed with his extensive experience, Lalique took a significant leap by establishing his own firm. By this point, Lalique had already garnered a remarkable reputation through his freelance work with esteemed French jewelry firms like Jacta, Cartier, Boucheron and Gariod. The turning point in Lalique's career came at the Paris Exposition Universelle in 1900, a grand event that attracted an astounding 50 million visitors. It was here that Lalique's Art Nouveau brooches and combs captured the attention of the discerning audience and brought him widespread acclaim on an international stage.

Throughout the early years of his firm, Lalique attracted an array of notable patrons, further solidifying his reputation for excellence. One such esteemed client was the legendary French actress Sarah Bernhardt, who adorned herself with Lalique's finest creations, showcasing their exquisite beauty to the world. Additionally, Calouste Gulbenkian, an influential oil magnate, became another distinguished patron of his work.

Inventor of Modern Jewelry: Original Technique

Lalique’s innovative spirit led him to explore and successfully introduce new materials such as horn, ivory, semi-precious stones and glass, which were not widely used before his time. He used these materials to incorporate elements of nature into his creations, much like the Japanese artisans who provided him with much inspiration.

Lalique's visionary approach to artistry distinguished him as a trailblazer, as he prioritized the artistic and aesthetic value of his creations over their price or luxury status. His profound fascination with rock crystal and architectural glass served as the catalyst for his daring experiments, leading to his renowned production of perfume bottles and the establishment of his own glass factories in Combs-la-Ville and Wingen-Sur-Moder, France.

Throughout his illustrious career, Lalique crafted an astonishing array of over 1,500 glass creations, spanning an impressive range of items including ashtrays, seals, clocks, paperweights, car mascots, vases, decanters, pitchers, glasses, stemware, plates, bowls, knife rests, lamps, pendants, brooches, necklaces, statues, plaques and countless other objects. To meet the growing demand from an eager public, specifically with the rise of Art Deco's design popularity, Lalique employed several hundred workers who diligently contributed to the production of these highly sought-after pieces.

Later Life and Legacy

In 1935, Lalique’s artistic prowess extended beyond jewelry as he adorned the haute couture salons of the renowned fashion designer Madeline Vionnet with his exquisite creations. Lalique's creativity also found expression in the form of designing glass doors for the Tokyo residence of Prince Yasuhiko Asaka. In that same remarkable year, he crafted a captivating fountain that graced the Galerie des Champs-Élysées in Paris, a monumental work of public art that captivated all who beheld its beauty. A testament to his prominence and success, the artist also established his own shop on 11 Rue Royal in Paris.

In 1945, Lalique passed away, leaving behind a monumental legacy. His visionary work continues to inspire and captivate audiences to this day, while his company continues to thrive, stewarding his artistic vision. Today, his original artworks are coveted by museums and collectors alike, and his name is practically synonymous with the famed Art Nouveau and Art Deco movements.

Quick Facts:

  • He was born in Aÿ-Champagne, France in 1860.
  • He is best known for his Art Nouveau and Art Deco glasswork, jewelry and perfume bottles.
  • His work was influenced by Japanese art, natural forms and symbolism.
  • He was a pioneer of new techniques in glassmaking, such as the use of mold-blown glass.
  • He was the first glassmaker to be elected to the Académie des Beaux-Arts in 1925.
  • Spouses:
    • Marie-Louise Lambert
    • Alice Ledru
  • He died in Paris in 1945.