Wedgwood Cobalt Majolica Wine and Water Ewers

  • This breathtaking pair of wine and water ewers are made after models by John Flaxman, circa 1775
  • Wedgwood began producing majolica pottery in 1860 to great acclaim
  • Majolica by the firm is highly sought after by collectors today
  • Get complete item description here
Item No. 31-4266

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This breathtaking pair of wine and water ewers are made after models by John Flaxman. These exquisitely detailed and lushly rendered ewers are fashioned in a shield shape with sprayed foliate handles. The top of the water ewer is adorned with a triton riding on the back of a dolphin, while the wine ewer depicts a Bacchanalian satyr holding the horns of a bearded ram above a panoply of ripe and luscious grapes. Both ewers are banded by oak leaves above stiff leaf-tips on a beaded fluted socle and square base. The interplay of colors, textures and themes on these vessels is truly wondrous, and their size makes them all the more impressive.

Majolica is created by applying an opaque white glaze to the pottery, then painting with stain or glazes before firing. The result is a brilliant, vivid high-gloss finish. Wedgwood began producing majolica in 1860 to great acclaim, and today it is highly sought after by collectors.

John Flaxman Sr. based his original molds, created circa 1775, on a pair of French bronze ewers. This pair has been exhibited at L.A.C.M.A. Wedgwood from California Collections, 27 January - 21 March 1976 (labels), and the Huntington Art Gallery in 1977-78 (labels).

Stamped "Wedgwood"

Date codes for 1867

17“ high x 8" wide x 8" deep

Provenance
Stuart and Carita Kadison Collection, No. 168 (labels)
Skinner, Boston, 1 October 2010, sale 2195B, lot 224
Wedgwood Cobalt Majolica Wine and Water Ewers
Maker: Wedgwood
Period: 19th Century
Origin: England
Type: Cups/Pitchers
Depth: 8.0 Inches
Width: 8.0 Inches
Height: 17.0 Inches

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